Author Archives: Olivia

Squash(ed) Soup!

Ingredients

Approx 1.5L water
Half a butternut squash, peeled and cut into approx. 3cm cubes
2 medium carrots roughly chopped
A handful of roughly chopped cavalo nero or kale leaves
2 diced onions
4 celery sticks diced
3-4 cloves garlic crushed or chopped
3cm of peeled, chopped fresh ginger
1 tablespoon olive or coconut oil
Freshly ground black or long pepper to taste
1 teaspoon of herby salt (e.g.Herbamare)
1-2 vegetable stock cubes (optional depending on your taste)
1 heaped teaspoons ground turmeric
1 heaped teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 heaped teaspoon fennel seeds
1 heaped teaspoon cumin seeds

Method

  • Use the oil to fry the onions over a very low heat, in a large heavy bottomed saucepan, until they soften.  Add the garlic, ginger, celery and spices and fry for a further minute, stirring to prevent sticking.
  • Add the water (pre-boiled to speed things up!) to the pan with the squash, carrots, salt & pepper and stock. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for around 30 mins or until the squash and carrots are soft. Add the Cavalo Nero or Kale and simmer for a further 5 mins.
  • Take the soup off the heat and squash it to your preferred consistency using a potato masher. This creates a delicious hearty soup which still has texture. It can be blended if preferred but you will need to change the name!

 

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Kitchen Encounters with Mike Abrahams

Take a glimpse into the kitchens of the experts! We asked our favourite nutritional experts to share with us their top 4 store cupboard staples and their go-to rustle-up suppers.

My kitchen staples

  • Tamari
  • A selection of dried seaweeds
  • Fresh ginger
  • Fresh turmeric

My quick rustle-up meal

turmeric rootNoodles!

Ingredients
(Organic wherever possible)

Medium sweet potato cut into small chunks
Handful fresh greens (broccoli, hispi/sweetheart cabbage, kale or whatever – sprouts, even) chopped fine (including stems – slice fine)
Medium red onion, finely sliced into half moons
Quarter beetroot julienne
2 large brown capped mushrooms sliced
Finger of turmeric finely sliced
Thumb of ginger medium sliced
2 cloves garlic chopped
10cm Wakame seaweed or piece of dulse about the size of your palm finely cut into pieces
1 tbsp coconut oil
Tamari and fresh ground black pepper to taste
1 tsp pink peppercorns
25 – 35ml boiling water or surplus stock from the noodles.
Any kind of noodles

*** Optional (add at the same time as the greens) – tofu, tempeh, tin of beans or whatever (pre-cooked) protein you like.

The cooking takes not much more than 10 minutes, so prepare the noodles accordingly to be ready about 10 minutes after you start the rest.

  • Sauté gently the onion garlic, ginger, seaweed and turmeric in the coconut oil until the onion is transparent
  • Add the chopped mushrooms and stir to coat the mushrooms
  • Add the whole pink peppercorns and cover, taking care to keep it all stirred and not catching
  • In a minute or so the mushrooms will become moist. At this point add the sweet potato and beetroot, a sprinkle of tamari and cover again
  • Saute for a further 3 minutes, at which time the mixture may be drying out and catching
  • At this point add the boiling water and the chopped greens. Raise the heat to a medium flame and cover. The moment the greens have become iridescent green, they are ready
  • Serve and enjoy

Or for fish eaters…

Ingredients

2 eggs, hard boiled and cold
1 tin tuna, sardines or mackerel
1 large avocado
2 cloves (or more) fresh garlic
juice of half a lemon
pinch of salt
TB extra virgin olive oil
fresh ground pepper

  • If using sardines, remove the spines first
  • Simply mash everything together to a firm mixture, leaving it coarse or fine according to preference
  • Serve on rice cakes, corn cakes, oatcakes or sourdough rye bread, with salad of your choice!

Mike Abrahams is the co-founder and Managing Director of Wild Oats!

Read more about the history of Wild Oats here…

 

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Kitchen Encounters with Atiya

Take a glimpse into the kitchens of the experts! We asked our favourite nutritional experts to share with us their top 4 store cupboard staples and their go-to rustle-up meals.

My kitchen staples

  • Red lentils
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Black bean spaghetti
  • Tamari

My 10 minute rustle-up meal

Atiya nutritionIngredients

Black bean spaghetti
Broccoli (or other seasonal greens)
1 carrot
1/2 avocado
Tamari
Lemon juice

Method

  • Cover black bean spaghetti in boiling water, and boil for about 5 minutes. You can add broccoli after a minute.
  • In the meantime, grate the carrot.
  • Once cooked, drain the spaghetti and mix through the carrot.
  • Serve with avocado, a drizzle of tamari and squeeze of lemon juice.

Atiya

www.atiya-nutrition.com

Atiya is a Bristol-based nutritional therapist (BSc (Hons), Dip. CNM, mBANT, CNHC, PGCE, GDL, LPC). Atiya offers personalised nutrition and lifestyle consultations, wellness packages with a private yoga class, home cooking advice and group health promotion programmes, all aiming to give you the tools to promote your own wellness.

Atiya is co-hosting a talk for Wild Oats on Mood Foods and Digestive Health in March, as part of the Health Connects Lecture series.

 

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Kitchen Encounters with Pam Buckle

Take a glimpse into the kitchens of the experts! We asked our favourite nutritional experts to share with us their top 4 store cupboard staples and their go-to rustle-up suppers.

My kitchen staples

Just 4 items? That’s difficult as I am the kind of person who likes a fully stocked kitchen at all times! But the 4 things I really hate to be without are:

  • Avocados
  • Nuts (almonds or walnuts)
  • Hummus
  • Organic carrots

Avocados give the feeling of a treat, while being ultra healthy. Either eaten alone, or whipped up into a version of guacamole and eaten with carrot sticks. My guacamole is either very garlicky with chilli and lemon, OR nothing like guacamole: creamy and mild with yoghurt.

A few walnuts or almonds are a quick snack, which will stop me wanting something sweet.

Hummus? Well, my friend Sian and I were saying the other day that you could probably live on it if you had to… protein from the chickpeas, healthy fats, garlic, and calcium from the sesame. Again eaten with carrot sticks is my favourite way. The smoked hummus we sell in Wild Oats is to die for, but it’s so simple to make hummus yourself with an ordinary blender.

And so organic carrots are my last staple for obvious reasons aforementioned! I will often take carrot sticks out with me in a tiny Tupperware. They satisfy a desire for sweetness too.

But what about…

Organic eggs: nature’s perfect packed lunch is a hard boiled egg;
Frozen peas
: they’re a green food in an emergency;
The essential bag of mixed leaves;
Frozen blueberries.

I could go on!

My quick supper

My quickest  supper has to be avocado slices with smoked salmon and rocket, all drizzled with extra virgin oil and a squeeze of lemon and black pepper.

Could that be any quicker?


Pam Buckle

Pam Buckle is in her 30th year of working as a Wild Oats Advisor! She is our natural remedies department manager.


To read more Kitchen Encounters, click here… 

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Kitchen Encounters with Jamie Richards

Take a glimpse into the kitchens of the experts! We asked our favourite nutritional experts to share with us their top 4 store cupboard staples and their go-to rustle-up suppers.

My kitchen staples

  • Ginger
  • Turmeric
  • Bone broth
  • Fine wine

My quick rustle-up supper

Chicken noodle broth

There are no amounts or exact guidelines here. Just variations of a concept. The idea is to take the goodness of the whole chicken especially the carcass then add a host of beneficial ingredients and flavours that stimulate the senses and your digestion. This has been my favourite meal for quite some time now and I don’t see that changing in a hurry.

Whole organic chicken
Lemon grass
Ginger
Garlic
Fresh turmeric
Live miso
Limes
Lime leaves
Pak choi
Spring onions
Thick noodles
Soya sauce
Coriander
Sweet basil
Mushrooms of some kind

  • Place a whole organic chicken in a large pot and cover with water. Bring to the boil, skim and then simmer for around an hour. Remove the chicken and leave it to cool whilst you strain the stock and return it to the pan.
  • At this point I normally have much more stock than I need so I put half of it to one side for the moment. To the other half I add 2 or 3 crushed lemon grass stalks (use the base of a saucepan or a rolling pin) and then a large thumb sized piece of crushed ginger and crushed fresh turmeric if you can get it, and 2 or 3 cloves of garlic all finely chopped or minced. Add 6ish kaffir lime leaves and a desert spoon of light miso or the Thai curry paste. Keep the broth simmering while you begin to strip the meat off the chicken. Add as much of the meat as you like and reserve the rest for another meal or two. Now add some noodles. I really like the King Soba pumpkin, ginger and brown rice ones right now. They’re substantial and have a nice bite to them. Add some greens like pak choi, chopped spring onions, a good splash of fish sauce and plenty of lime juice. Right at the end add a large amount of chopped coriander and some sweet basil and mint.
  • Lastly, you can break up the chicken carcass and return to the left over stock. Add some more water and add a good dash of apple cider vinegar to help release the goodness from the bones. Simmer it for another 2 hours at least (or ideally use a slow cooker overnight). Strain it off and allow it to cool. It will refrigerate well for 3 days or freeze for longer. Use ice cube trays to freeze it then you have small stock blocks to add to any cooking food.

Jamie Richards

www.jamierichards.co.uk

Jamie is unique in the world of health and performance. Having studied as a nutritional therapist he went on to become one of the very few UK trained Clinical Psycho-Neuro-Immunologist. Jamie works with world class performers from free-divers to Everest summiteers and ultra-endurance athletes. The other side of Jamie’s business sees him work with those who are struggling with their health and may not be responding to conventional therapy. Unresolved pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia, digestive complaints, migraines, skin conditions and bone disorders are just some of the conditions that may benefit from his approach.

Jamie founded and hosts the Health Connects Lecture series in Bristol.


Read more Kitchen Encounters, click here…

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Cauliflower, Turmeric & Cumin Soup

From Anna Middleton and the Diabeatit team

Soups are good for weight loss because of their low calorie density, or relatively low number of calories compared to their serving size. Fibre and protein are filling nutrients, so choose a soup with ingredients such as vegetables, beans and a lean protein.

3 white onions
3 cloves garlic
1 medium cauliflower
1 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp turmeric powder
Pinch black pepper
1 Tbsp coconut oil
3 tsp veg powder

  • Roast or dry pan fry cumin seeds and put them to one side for later
  • Add onions, garlic and cauliflower to the pan with a little oil then, on a low heat, sweat them down with a pinch of salt for 30-40 minutes. Adding a pinch of salt at the beginning help
    If you can hear them frying the temperature is too high. The aim is to sweat them down to release the natural sugars not fry them.
  • When the vegetables are soft, add the turmeric and toasted cumin seeds and cook for another 5 minutes
  • When the vegetables are coated, add organic vegetable stock and cover with water. Cook for another 40/50 minutes then blend
  • Season with salt and pepper
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Diabetes, Diet and Joy A Fresh Perspective

For more details about Diabeatit, visit our website: www.diabeatit.co.uk

Anna Middleton is a raw chef and health educator. As well as working 1-2-1 with clients, combining nutritional support and hands-on experience in the kitchen, she runs raw food classes in Bristol and around the UK, and offers talks for health retreats. Raw cakes and chocolates can be made to order and posted nationwide. Visit her website: www.annamiddleton.com

Next Diabeatit Taster Day 
Sunday 5th February
Salt Cafe, Bristol 


About a year ago we had an experience giving a talk when we were describing how to make sweet treats that keep your blood sugar stable.  For us all this was just part of our overall approach, but certainly not central to Diabeatit’s philosophy.  Then one of our audience began to cry.  None of us have forgotten this.  She had been a dedicated home baker before her diagnosis, she was now eating well, but joylessly and had thought that she was condemned to “medicinal” food, that delight, pleasure, and making treats for her grandchildren – that all the deep social and personal pleasures of food – were gone for her, forever.  It was then that all 3 of us realised how important this message of joy with food really was. And this is the message we want to share with you.

For any diet changes or, in fact, any programme aimed at getting yourself back to health, to be useful it has to contain this one essential key ingredient: joy.

The term diabetes comes with lots of baggage. There’s the fear: “will I go blind… lose a limb… die young?” And there’s the loathing: “I’m at fault… I did this to myself. Why don’t I have better will power?” By the way, you didn’t do this to yourself.  That is far too simplistic a view. But more on that in a moment. With these twin monsters running rampage through your head, it is easy to become obsessively restrictive with food as a way to punish yourself for your “transgressions”.

Here are two of the most common, yet least helpful, approaches often taken by those trying to change their eating habits (including many professionals):

1.       Making good food stressful, and adopting the view, “I have to reverse all this damage NOW”

At Diabeatit we see people frightened to add a beautiful organic green apple to their juice because it is “too much sugar” or set on avoiding beetroot at all costs, despite it being a superb liver tonic and great for blood pressure. Overnight, many people try to ditch what was a daily regime of processed food in favour of an intensive and hugely restrictive detoxifying diet. They “white knuckle” their way through a radical change to long-standing eating patterns, which leaves them vulnerable and at war with themselves over food. Forget about whether food tastes good, or whether it can nourish you on an emotional level and contribute to a feeling of well-being. Food becomes about low GI, and what is allowed or forbidden. This approach can profoundly limit one’s ability to improve health and feel good. Firstly, nothing tastes better than forbidden foods. On sure way to induce a craving for junk food is to tell yourself it is forbidden! Taking this approach is quite simply a lousy way to get poor quality foods out of your life. Ask Adam and Eve how well food prohibition went for them!  If you find yourself feeling judgemental, anxious or controlling around food, it’s a gentle sign that your plan isn’t sustainable and that you haven’t found your equilibrium yet. So take a deep breath and ease up on yourself a little.

Secondly, we have found that people can make huge strides forwards in terms of their health, and begin to feel better, by simply cutting out processed foods as a first step. They find that their diets then naturally evolve, becoming increasingly nutritious as their palates change and as their addiction to sugar subsides. Now that is something to get hooked on! But embracing good nutrition is more akin to running a marathon than a sprint; and you are more likely to be eating well in 5 years if you don’t burn yourself out in the first 6 weeks. No one who wants to finish a marathon goes into sprint-mode at the start; and we would argue that no one who wants to achieve their goal of reversing diabetes should start with a green smoothie containing raw onion for breakfast! (Yes, this is the breakfast of a very unhappy person with T2 we spoke with only last weekend).

2.      Believing, “If it tastes good it must be bad for me”, or “I will never have a delicious meal again (see onion smoothie above!)”

So, now you’ve decided that food is your medicine (which is admirable), you may also – even unconsciously – have decided that it needs to taste like medicine too. We may have been led to believe that diabetes T2 is the result of gluttony, and feel that we deserve to be punished by food and by taking delight out of the picture. This is quite simply a myth constructed by the food industry, which avoids taking any responsibility profits from making us believe that all of our health problems are of our own doing, while sabotaging our efforts to get well.

Now, how do you sidestep these two appallingly useless but incredibly common approaches to healing yourself with food? We believe that the answer lies in following your joy!  Joy is a brilliant antidote to the fear and shame that people with type 2 have lumbered with.

We get delight from food that we linger over or share with loved ones. If you adopt a healthy diet consisting of food that is pleasant and deeply satisfying, then your eating plan will be stress-free and easy to stick to. So, go forth, experiment and embrace a joyful approach to cooking and eating! Enjoying incorporating new foods into your diet that keep your sugar levels stable, and you will find new sources of sweetness that wont cause your blood sugars to spike.

We believe that in order for food to be good for you, it also needs to taste pretty good. You might have to push a little at the beginning, to familiarise yourself with new tastes, but persevere! The recipes below contain some more unusual ingredients, and we’ve included them deliberately, to encourage you to start playing. It can be a tightrope to walk. If your diet has, until now, been rich in high-sugar fatty foods then wholefoods will taste different, and your poor brain will be craving that dopamine hit that it has been used to receiving from those foods. But be persistent, and be patient. Your taste buds will change completely within a few weeks. Challenge yourself, but never make yourself miserable. Make a commitment to walk the tightrope!

We hope that you will find the following two recipes both delicious and comforting. They will keep your sugars stable and nourish you. Initiate an honest and loving dialogue with yourself about what you enjoy, when are you hungry, and when are might be eating out of habit. These gentle conversations with yourself along with some lovely AND nourishing foods will be a faster route to getting well and staying well. Research suggests we need about 9 exposures to a new food to learn to really enjoy it. So be kind to yourself, be persistent in your attempts to eat well and, most importantly, enJOY.


hot choc (1)Spiced Chocolate

Raw chocolate is particularly high in nutrients, and this is one of those nourishing treats that can help you through dark evenings when you might feel tempted to indulge in foods that aren’t quite so good for you!  Yacon is a root vegetable that tastes sweet but contains no sugar at all.

200ml of your favourite mylk (we like coconut or almond more than cashew for people with diabetes – they are lower in carbohydrate)
150ml hot water
4 teaspoons of raw cacao powder (full of antioxidants)
1 teaspoon lecithin (go for organic sunflower if you can.  Lecithin helps you digest fats and is important to your liver)
2 teaspoons of Peruvian carob (naturally sweet and doesn’t spike blood sugar).
¼ teaspoon cinnamon (helps combat insulin resistance. Get as much of this spice into your diet as you can)
30ml Yacon syrup
2 teaspoons of coconut oil

Optional extras
– a pinch of cayenne pepper great for your circulation and makes this an amazing spicy almost Mexican hot chocolate)
– orange rind or clementine skin (citrus is particularly good for lifting moods, so if you are feeling a little flat, steep a little rind or skin in your hot chocolate while you drink)

  • Boil the kettle
  • Place all of the ingredients in a blender and whizz together for a more velvety hot chocolate
  • EnJOY! (NOT in front of the telly. Pay complete attention to every sip!)

turmeric cauliflower soup (1)Cauliflower, Turmeric & Cumin Soup

Soups are good for weight loss because of their low calorie density, or relatively low number of calories compared to their serving size. Fibre and protein are filling nutrients, so choose a soup with ingredients such as vegetables, beans and a lean protein.

3 white onions
3 cloves garlic
1 medium cauliflower
1 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp turmeric powder
Pinch black pepper
1 Tbsp coconut oil
3 tsp veg powder

 

  • Roast or dry pan fry cumin seeds and put them to one side for later
  • Add onions, garlic and cauliflower to the pan with a little oil then, on a low heat, sweat them down with a pinch of salt for 30-40 minutes. Adding a pinch of salt at the beginning help
  • If you can hear them frying the temperature is too high. The aim is to sweat them down to release the natural sugars not fry them.
  • When the vegetables are soft, add the turmeric and toasted cumin seeds and cook for another 5 minutes
  • When the vegetables are coated, add organic vegetable stock and cover with water. Cook for another 40/50 minutes then blend
  • Season with salt and pepper

 

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Long Pepper Cream

From The Telegraph.

Ingredients

1 x 300ml of thick cream or CoYo coconut yoghurt
4 tbsp brown sugar
5 cardamom seeds, crushed
1 vanilla pod, seeds scraped from the pod
5 long pepper spikes, snapped, cracked and ground
Stewed fruit, to serve

Method

  • Whisk the cream.
  • Mix the spices and vanilla seeds together and whisk into the cream, reserving a little to sprinkle on top for aroma.
  • Serve with seasonal fresh or stewed fruit.
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Kitchen Encounters with Caroline Pringle

Take a glimpse into the kitchens of the experts! We asked our favourite nutritional experts to share with us their top 4 store cupboard staples and their go-to rustle-up suppers.

My kitchen staples

  • Biona coconut oil (mild)
  • Avocado
  • Frozen blackcurrants
  • Sweet potato

My quick rustle-up breakfast/pud

Caroline Pringle 2 My favourite smoothie of the moment..

Handful of roasted sweet potato
1/4 – 1/2 banana
Handful of baby spinach
1/2 glass coconut milk (depending on thickness)
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp chopped ginger
1 tsp chia seeds
1 tsp maca powder
1/2 tsp coconut oil
1/2 tsp turmeric root
Couple pinches black pepper
1/2 – 1 medjool date (depending on sweetness)

*** If you want more a mousse-like texture, try adding 1 tsp chia seeds, 1/2 avocado, 1 tsp cacao powder, 1 tsp coconut oil

 

  • Blend for 5-10 seconds.
  • Try adding berries or oats… Experiment!

Caroline Pringle

www.bistolhealthandnutrition.com

Caroline is a Bristol-based CNM qualified nutritionist with a history in natural health solutions, bodywork and therapy. She is also a former Director and Producer of ITV. She is a great believer in the power of nature and takes a people-centred approach which draws on the latest scientific research.

Caroline is co-hosting a talk for Wild Oats on Mood Foods and Digestive Health in March, as part of the Health Connects Lecture series.


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Kitchen Encounters with Sally Beare

Take a glimpse into the kitchens of the experts! We asked our favourite nutritional experts to share with us their top 4 store cupboard staples and their go-to rustle-up suppers.

My kitchen staples

  • Extra Virgin olive oil, for drizzling
  • Garlic, to add to anything I can
  • Ground almonds, for pancakes and healthy bakes
  • Japanese green tea leaves, to make several mugfuls a day

My quick rustle-up supper

Black beans in baked potato or on a corn tortilla, with sour cream, guacamole and fresh coriander.

sally beare fave meal


Sally Beare, dip BCNH, CNHC
www.sallybeare.com

Sally is a Bristol-based nutritional therapist. As well as seeing clients she is a regular columnist for Juno magazine, has given workshops on nutrition in schools, lectured at the UK College of Nutrition and Health, and written three books: The Live-Longer Diet, 50 Secrets of the World’s Longest-Living People, and The Stacking Plan.

Sally is hosting a talk for Wild Oats on her Stacking Plan approach in July, as part of the Health Connects Lecture series.


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